Tag Archives: 9/11

9/11 Memorial at UMass Lowell

9 11 uml

Monument to the University of Massachusetts Lowell community (alumni and family members of alumni) who perished on September 11, 2001: Patrick J Quigley IV, Christopher Zarba ’79, Jessica Leigh Sachs, John A Ogonowski, ’72, Robert J Hayes, ’86, Brian K Kinney, ’95, and  Douglas A Gowell, ’71. Photos by Tony Sampas.

9 11 John Ogonowski name

 

“THE NAMES” 

by Billy Collins

Yesterday, I lay awake in the palm of the night.
A soft rain stole in, unhelped by any breeze,
And when I saw the silver glaze on the windows,
I started with A, with Ackerman, as it happened,
Then Baxter and Calabro,
Davis and Eberling, names falling into place
As droplets fell through the dark.
Names printed on the ceiling of the night.
Names slipping around a watery bend.
Twenty-six willows on the banks of a stream.
In the morning, I walked out barefoot
Among thousands of flowers
Heavy with dew like the eyes of tears,
And each had a name –
Fiori inscribed on a yellow petal
Then Gonzalez and Han, Ishikawa and Jenkins.
Names written in the air
And stitched into the cloth of the day.
A name under a photograph taped to a mailbox.
Monogram on a torn shirt,
I see you spelled out on storefront windows
And on the bright unfurled awnings of this city.
I say the syllables as I turn a corner –
Kelly and Lee,
Medina, Nardella, and O’Connor.
When I peer into the woods,
I see a thick tangle where letters are hidden
As in a puzzle concocted for children.
Parker and Quigley in the twigs of an ash,
Rizzo, Schubert, Torres, and Upton,
Secrets in the boughs of an ancient maple.
Names written in the pale sky.
Names rising in the updraft amid buildings.
Names silent in stone
Or cried out behind a door.
Names blown over the earth and out to sea.
In the evening — weakening light, the last swallows.
A boy on a lake lifts his oars.
A woman by a window puts a match to a candle,
And the names are outlined on the rose clouds –
Vanacore and Wallace,
(let X stand, if it can, for the ones unfound)
Then Young and Ziminsky, the final jolt of Z.
Names etched on the head of a pin.
One name spanning a bridge, another undergoing a tunnel.
A blue name needled into the skin.
Names of citizens, workers, mothers and fathers,
The bright-eyed daughter, the quick son.
Alphabet of names in a green field.
Names in the small tracks of birds.
Names lifted from a hat
Or balanced on the tip of the tongue.
Names wheeled into the dim warehouse of memory.
So many names, there is barely room on the walls of the heart.

.

—Billy Collins (c) 2002

Note: Billy Collins was Poet Laureate of the United States from 2001 to 2003. His poem “The Names” appeared in the New York Times on Sept. 6, 2002. Note that he mentions Patrick Quigley, who was married to a UMass Lowell alumna, Patricia Fleming. Some of our readers may know Billy Collins from his appearances on the radio show Prairie Home Companion. Billy Collins’s father, William Collins, was an electrician from Lowell, Mass., who married Katherine Collins. The future poet was born in New York City. Here’s what he told The Paris Review about his roots in an interview in 2001:

Both of my parents were born in 1901 and both lived into their nineties, the two of them just about straddling the century. My father was from a large Irish family from Lowell, Massachusetts, a mill town, incidentally Kerouac’s birthplace and the site of his first novel. I’ve never been to Lowell, but I was just invited by an editor of a magazine to go up there and write about my father and look at the Jack Kerouac place. I have a poem called ‘Lowell,’ which is about the coincidence of my father being born in the same town as Jack Kerouac. You couldn’t find two more disparate characters. The end of the poem says something like, He would have told Neal Cassady to let him out at the next light.

My mother was born on a farm in Canada. She was the one who taught me to read by reading to me. I have a feeling that was one of the most important experiences of my life. …

 

Hundreds Celebrate Restoration of the Grotto and Way of the Cross at Franco American School

Congratulations to Franco American School Principal Lorraine Richard, SCQ, Director of Development Colleen Tully and the Board of Directors of the Franco American School, former state Sen. Steven Panagiokos, and all the generous craftspeople and donors for the extraordinary restoration of the Way of the Cross at the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes on the grounds of the school. More than 500 people attended the outdoor Mass celebrated by Cardinal Sean O’Malley yesterday, and hundreds attended a dinner at Mt. Pleasant Golf Club in the Highlands.

Special credit goes to Kevin Roy, Jussaume Construction and Mill City Fabricators, and Dennis McGrade for their fine craftmanship in restoring this special place in Lowell.

Of note also is that seven stations of Our Lady of Sorrows were added to the site this fall in memory of Brian Kinney, a 1987 alumnus of the school, who perished on 9/11 as a passenger in United Airlines Flight 175, which was crashed into the World Trade Center by terrorists.

Learn more about the Grotto and Way of the Cross here.

Below is a photo of the 2008 Mass in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the school.

 

‘The Names’ by Billy Collins

“The Names”

Yesterday, I lay awake in the palm of the night.
A soft rain stole in, unhelped by any breeze,
And when I saw the silver glaze on the windows,
I started with A, with Ackerman, as it happened,
Then Baxter and Calabro,
Davis and Eberling, names falling into place
As droplets fell through the dark.
Names printed on the ceiling of the night.
Names slipping around a watery bend.
Twenty-six willows on the banks of a stream.
In the morning, I walked out barefoot
Among thousands of flowers
Heavy with dew like the eyes of tears,
And each had a name –
Fiori inscribed on a yellow petal
Then Gonzalez and Han, Ishikawa and Jenkins.
Names written in the air
And stitched into the cloth of the day.
A name under a photograph taped to a mailbox.
Monogram on a torn shirt,
I see you spelled out on storefront windows
And on the bright unfurled awnings of this city.
I say the syllables as I turn a corner –
Kelly and Lee,
Medina, Nardella, and O’Connor.
When I peer into the woods,
I see a thick tangle where letters are hidden
As in a puzzle concocted for children.
Parker and Quigley in the twigs of an ash,
Rizzo, Schubert, Torres, and Upton,
Secrets in the boughs of an ancient maple.
Names written in the pale sky.
Names rising in the updraft amid buildings.
Names silent in stone
Or cried out behind a door.
Names blown over the earth and out to sea.
In the evening — weakening light, the last swallows.
A boy on a lake lifts his oars.
A woman by a window puts a match to a candle,
And the names are outlined on the rose clouds –
Vanacore and Wallace,
(let X stand, if it can, for the ones unfound)
Then Young and Ziminsky, the final jolt of Z.
Names etched on the head of a pin.
One name spanning a bridge, another undergoing a tunnel.
A blue name needled into the skin.
Names of citizens, workers, mothers and fathers,
The bright-eyed daughter, the quick son.
Alphabet of names in a green field.
Names in the small tracks of birds.
Names lifted from a hat
Or balanced on the tip of the tongue.
Names wheeled into the dim warehouse of memory.
So many names, there is barely room on the walls of the heart.

.

—Billy Collins (c) 2002

Note: Billy Collins was Poet Laureate of the United States from 2001 to 2003. His poem “The Names” appeared in the New York Times on Sept. 6, 2002. Note that he mentions Patrick Quigley, who was married to a UMass Lowell alumna, Patricia Fleming. Some of our readers may know Billy Collins from his appearances on the radio show Prairie Home Companion. Billy Collins’s father, William Collins, was an electrician from Lowell, Mass., who married Katherine Collins. The future poet was born in New York City. Here’s what he told The Paris Review about his roots in an interview in 2001:

Both of my parents were born in 1901 and both lived into their nineties, the two of them just about straddling the century. My father was from a large Irish family from Lowell, Massachusetts, a mill town, incidentally Kerouac’s birthplace and the site of his first novel. I’ve never been to Lowell, but I was just invited by an editor of a magazine to go up there and write about my father and look at the Jack Kerouac place. I have a poem called ‘Lowell,’ which is about the coincidence of my father being born in the same town as Jack Kerouac. You couldn’t find two more disparate characters. The end of the poem says something like, He would have told Neal Cassady to let him out at the next light.

My mother was born on a farm in Canada. She was the one who taught me to read by reading to me. I have a feeling that was one of the most important experiences of my life. …

 

“9/11″

9/11

.

In their Catholic high school, John one day sat down for lunch next to a quiet kid who needed a big friend, and the quiet kid grew up to be a teacher and never forgot what it meant to have that new friend—he told people about his friend John, the big-hearted, big-spirited kid who grew up to be a pilot and a farmer, who shared his farmland with Asian refugees who had resettled in the gritty precincts of the city next door and who wanted to grow vegetables as they did in their homelands, places where John had flown cargo planes during the war there—John the preservationist, who protected open space in Dracut, the town whose original Indian name Agumtoocook means “A Place in the Woods”—John, who took his Boeing 767 up on September 11, 2001, into a sky that pilots call “severe clear,” who guided American Airlines Flight 11 out of Boston’s Logan Airport, where so many of us have flown away with faith in technology, management, and civilized behavior, John, who took his passengers and crew up into a blue sky on a day when he had as usual driven in early from Marsh Hill in Dracut to captain his plane across country, that day like any other in the late summer, not officially Fall even though schools were in session, that day like no other by the end of the surprise attack, by the end of the paper rain and ash-cloud, by the end of the twisted steel and burnt ground, by the end of John’s life—on that day from which we have not recovered the bounce that had always made people elsewhere admire our sure belief that we’d figure out a problem and invent the next dazzle—a day that moved John’s neighbors and even people who had never met him to drive slowly up the winding hill road that leads to his farm, where they heaped flowers, hand-made signs, candles, and sympathy cards in front of the wide white gate leading to the farm—and past the white gate up the driveway rose a giant crane holding up an American flag that looked as big as the flag that covers the left field wall at Fenway Park on opening day—and past the crane and flag stood the farmhouse of John’s family, his wife and daughters, who needed him to come back so he would sit next to them at the table in the house one more time, just as he had done all those years ago when the good guy sat next to the shy kid who needed a friend.

.

—Paul Marion (c) 2011

UMass Lowell and City of Lowell 9/11 Remembrances

The City of Lowell and UMass Lowell have events planned to mark the tenth anniversary of 9/11.

On Thursday, Sept. 8, at 11 am, the public and university community are invited to join Chancellor Marty Meehan and guest speakers for the rededication of the UMass Lowell 9/11 Memorial.

Members of the University community lost on that day ten years ago included Douglas A. Gowell ’71, John A. Ogonowski ’72, Robert J. Hayes ’86. Brian Kinney ’95, Patrick Quigley (husband of Patricia Fleming ’86 and son-in-law of Mathematics Prof. Emeritus Brendan Fleming), Jessica Leigh Sachs (daughter of alumni Stephen and Karen Sachs), and Christopher Zarba, who studied in the College of Music in the 1970s.

The Memorial, titled “Unity” and installed in 2004, was designed by UMass Lowell art students Gail Milligan, Rebekah Hermans, and Janet Wittlinger. The students worked under the direction of UMass Lowell Prof. of Art and sculptor Jim Coates, whose studio class participated in a design competition for the project. A selection committee of campus and community representatives chose “Unity” for its simple and symbolic design, a site-specific artwork that is meant to be a place of reflection and meditation as well as thoughtful remembrance on the Riverwalk along the Merrimack.

Please gather at the Memorial near Leitch Hall, 111 Pawtucket Street, on the East Campus (opposite the Fox Hall high-rise student residence hall). Parking is available in the University lot off Perkins Street in the Lawrence Mills complex. A light lunch reception follows the ceremony. RSVP to jacqueline_ledoux@uml.eduor call 978-934-2236.

On Friday, Sept. 9,  at 7:30 am, the Lowell High School Junior Airforce ROTC will conduct a Memorial Tribute at the Lowell High School Memorial Courtyard.

On Friday at 10 am, join Mayor James L. Milinazzo, officials, City employees and partners in remembering 9/11.  The City is partnering with Community Teamwork Inc. Senior Corp Programs for a commemorative flag-raising ceremony and observance.  To honor our local men and women in uniform the event will include the LHS JROTC Color Guard, LHS Spindle Show Choir, LPD, LFD and first responders. Please gather at Lowell City Hall, 375 Merrimack St. For information, contact Diane Bujnowski, Office of the Mayor, 978-970-4040.

 

 

UMass Lowell Announces 9/11 Memorial Rededication

Chancellor Marty Meehan has invited the UMass Lowell community and the public to join him and guest speakers to honor members of the campus community lost on 9/11/01 on Thursday, Sept. 8, at 11 a.m., at the site of the UMass Lowell 9/11 Memorial.

The ceremony will feature a rededication of the 9/11 Memorial, titled “Unity” and designed by then-UMass Lowell art students Gail Milligan, Rebekah Hermans, and Janet Wittlinger. The sculptural tribute was installed in May 2004.

Those remembered with names inscribed on the circular stone sculpture are Douglas A. Gowell, ’71, Methuen; Robert J. Hayes, ’87, Amesbury; Brian K. Kinney, ’95, Lowell; John Ogonowski, ’72, Dracut; Patrick Quigley, husband of Patricia Fleming Quigley, ’86; Jessica Sachs, Billerica, former student and daughter of alumni Stephen R. and Karen D. Sachs, both ’69; and Christopher Zarba, Hopkinton, who studied at Lowell in the 1970s.

Location: Lowell Riverwalk behind Letich Hall, 111 Pawtucket St., UMass Lowell East Campus.

Light refreshments will be served following the ceremony.  For details and to RSVP, contact the UMass Lowell Alumni Relations Office, jacqueline_ledoux@uml.edu or 978-934-2236.

‘Common’

Common

.

Nineteenth-century designers saw parks as breathing spaces whose trees would pump oxygen through tenement and mansion alike. Even the vocabulary of green spaces freshens speech—grove and bee, clover and pebble, pine cone and jay.  Seagulls on the common across the street from my family’s house stand as stout as their kin ranged in loose ranks at the beach. Crows in our back yard could be black gulls for their mass and power. The birds sound off at the sight of local cats, this week fixed on a badger in a granite scrap pile out back. Squirrels that clipped the red and yellow tulips now scale the arbor dripping  grapes. We named our vine for 9/11 after my wife and son made purple jelly for the first time only days after the planes were crashed—the vine like hundreds in our neighborhood, where yards rival Rose Bowl floats. Up early on Chapel Street, standing in the driveway, Joe and Teresa Silva hear the larks and the locomotive pulling toward Boston.

.

—Paul Marion (c) 2006, from “What Is the City?” (Evening Album Media, 2006)

Kristof Praises ’9/11 Healers’

In today’s NYTimes, columnist Nicholas D. Kristof writes about Susan Retik and Patricia (Fleming) Quigley, who co-founded Beyond the 11th after their husbands were killed in the 9/11 attacks as a way to reach out to women in Afghanistan who, like them, lost their husbands in violent incidents. Patti (Fleming) Quigley is from Lowell.  Read the column here, and get the NYT if you appreciate the writing.